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Category Archive: Leuser National Park

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Mount Leuser National Park of Sumatra Indonesia

Mount Leuser National Park is one of the largest national parks in the world, containing over 800,000 hectares of virgin rainforest. The park is home to orangutans, gibbons, monkeys, elephants, tigers, and among the last of the Sumatran rhinoceros. There are research facilities for the study of primates, birds and insects, the Orangutans rehabilitation center at Bukit Lawang being the most popular with tourists. It is possible to raft Alas River from Ketambe to the Indian Ocean on a 4 – 5 day expedition. The journey takes us through exciting white-water rapids to the calmer, crocodile-infested waters of the lowlands. Basic accommodation is available at Ketambe.

The Leuser National Park of Gunung Leuser is probably the wildest in Indonesia, located in Southeast Aceh, can be reached from either Kutacane, or Takengon. This magnificent national park has a wealth of flora and fauna. The Leuser Ecosystem is an outstanding wilderness in Aceh northern Sumatra. It is one of the richest expanses of tropical rain forest in Southeast Asia. More than 2.5 million hectares in size, it is the last place on earth where elephants, rhinos, tigers, clouded leopards, and orangutans are found within one area.

The park is named after one of its highest point, the 3,381m Mount Leuser (Gunung Leuser). The highest point in the park is “Puncak Tak Punya Nama” (“The peak with no name”).

The first official statement of intent to protect the Leuser Ecosystem was signed in 1934. The Leuser International Foundation (a non-profit non-government organization) was established in the late 1990’s when the ecosystem was seriously under threat from illegal logging and wildlife poaching.
Geographically, the Leuser Ecosystem lies between 3-4.5° North and 96.5-98° East. It covers approximately 2.6 million hectares of tropical rain forest, encompassing 890,000 hectares of designated national park, as well as extensive areas of protection and production forests. The ecosystem contains two major volcanoes, three lakes, and nine major river systems that flow to the east and west coasts of the island.

The Leuser Ecosystem has an enormous level of biodiversity. It contains at least 127 mammal species, including the Sumatran elephant, Sumatran tiger, Sumatran rhinoceros, and Sumatran orangutan. About 8,500 different plant species grow in the beach, swamp, lowland, mountain and alpine ecosystems of the Leuser Ecosystem. Of the 10,000 plant species recorded in the West Indo-Malayan Region, 45% are found in the Leuser Ecosystem. Spectacular plants such as Rafflesia (the largest flower in the world) and Amorphophallus (the tallest flower in the world) are among the plants protected there.

Mount Leuser National Park is one of the biggest national parks in Indonesia (950,000 hectare). Actually, it’s a collection of various nature reserves and forests: Nature Reserve Mount Leuser, Nature Reserve Kappi, Nature Reserve Kluet, Sikundur Langkat Wildlife Reserve, Ketambe Research Station, Singkil Barat and Dolok Sembilin. Most parts of the national park lie in the region Aceh Tenggara (SE Aceh). Other parts are situated in the region east Aceh, south Aceh, and Langkat.

Mount Leuser National Park comprises more than 100 kilometers of the Bukit Barisan Mountains. Because of that, the park consists of steep, almost inaccessible mountainous terrain. The altitude ranges from 0 meter, in Kluet (South Aceh), to 3,381 meter, on top of the mount Leuser (Southeast Aceh). The Alas River cuts the park into an eastern and western half. Apart from mountains we find several other ecosystems: beach forest, swamp areas, lowland rainforest, alpine and mountain forest. In Bukit Lawang is the Orang Utan Rehabilitation Station and in Ketambe stands the Ketambe research station.

Covering both resilient Nangroe Aceh Darussalam and antique North Sumatra Province, most parts of the national park rest in the lush South East Aceh region, blessed with tropical fruits like mango, rambutan, durian, avocado, orange, papaya, and guava. The other parts are situated in the east Aceh, south Aceh, and Langkat of North Sumatra, known to produce world-class coffee and tobacco. Most visitors normally start their adventures in the national park through Bukit Lawang, North Sumatra, where you can always find the gentle giants of the jungle, the orangutans. Discover the gentleness of these sociable primates as your discovery of Sumatra begins right here.

Mount Leuser National Park, named after its highest peak, Mount Leuser (3,381 m), is one of the largest and the most diverse national parks in Indonesia, covering an area of 7,927 square kilometer in the northern tip of Sumatera, Indonesia. Embracing various ecosystems, the national park is in fact a cluster of various nature reserves and forests: Gunung Leuser Nature Reserve, Kappi Nature Reserve, Kluet Nature Reserve, Sikundur-Langkat Wildlife Reserve, Ketambe Research Station, Singkil Barat, and Dolok Sembilin.

The park is so extensive, it covers mangroves, beach and swamp forest, lowland rainforest, moss forest, and up to subalpine forest. When traversing its extraordinary landscape, enthusiastic adventurer like you will not be disappointed.

The Mount Leuser National Park, which is Taman Nasional Gunung Leuser in Bahasa, encompasses more than 100 kilometers of the Bukit Barisan Mountains, known for its steep, almost inaccessible mountainous terrains. The altitude ranges from beach area in Kluet (South Aceh), to 3,381 meter on top of the Gunung Leuser (Southeast Aceh). The breathtaking Alas River cuts the park into an eastern and western half, where your tropical thirst for adrenaline will be captivatingly fulfilled.

Around 130 species are identified in this park only. The mysterious Sumatran tigers, elephants, rhinos, Siamang monkeys, macaques, clouded leopards, reptiles, fish, and around 325 species of birds are among the endemic wildlife known to inhibit the park. Surely the trek to the inner park is more than just a great adventure to the last zoo you visited. Come and take in the experience living in a small friendly village, Ketambe, where the locals are naturally knowledgeable and ecologically hospitable.

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